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Pregnancy, Maternity Benefits and other Resources

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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Pregnancy, Maternity Benefits and other Resources
    Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:08pm
I am pregnant. Where can I find services?

Many organizations have services for pregnant women. You can find services and support in community-based non-profit organizations, community health centres, community centres and hospitals.

Prenatal and Postnatal Care

Pre-natal services can help you during your pregnancy. Postnatal services help you after your baby is born.

For example, the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP) funds prenatal programs for pregnant women. The purpose of these groups is to reduce the rate of unhealthy birth weights, improve the health of both baby and mother, and also to encourage breastfeeding. Find a Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP) Project in your community.

Public health units have a program called Healthy Babies, Healthy Children (HBHC). This program is for families with children from before birth up to 6 years old. The HBHC program works with hospitals, doctors, public health nurses, home visitors and service agencies in the community. Contact your local public health unit for more information.



Edited by skhatoon - Oct/07/2010 at 10:00am
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:08pm

Doctors and Midwives

You may want to see a family doctor or a midwife when you think you are pregnant. Family doctors can tell you how to take care of yourself and the baby. They can refer you to an obstetrician. An obstetrician is a doctor who specializes in pregnancy and childbirth.

A midwife provides primary care to low-risk women throughout pregnancy, labour and birth. A midwife also provides care to you and your baby for 6 weeks after birth. With a midwife, you can give birth at home or in a hospital - it is your choice. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care pays for the cost of midwife services. If you do not have OHIP, you may need to pay for some services, such as blood tests and hospital fees.

Midwifery in Ontario - Information about midwives and services provided by midwives in Ontario. From the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.
  • College of Midwives of Ontario - This organization regulates midwives in Ontario. The website has information about midwifery and how to find a midwife.
  • Association of Ontario Midwives - Information about midwifery, answers to frequently asked questions, and how to find a midwife.


  • Edited by skhatoon - Oct/06/2010 at 3:11pm
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:08pm

    Community Health Centres

    Some Community Health Centres (CHCs) have pre-natal and post-natal services. Some CHCs can help you even if you do not have OHIP.

    Find more information in What are community health centres?

    Find a Community Health Centre in your community.



    Edited by skhatoon - Oct/06/2010 at 3:10pm
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:09pm
    Women's Health Information: Pregnancy - Information about pregnancy, labour and delivery. From the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:09pm
    Women's Health Matters: Pregnancy - Information about preconception, pregnancy, giving birth and life with a newborn baby.
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:10pm
    Community Health Centre (CHC) Locations - Links to CHCs in Ontario.
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:14pm

    Giving Birth in a New Land – A Guide for Women New to Canada and Their Families

    This guide is for you, if you are a newcomer woman who is pregnant and you plan to give birth in Ontario.

    It has information about prenatal and postnatal practices in Ontario. Use this guide to find services and resources in your area.

    These files are in Adobe Acrobat format. You need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view these files.

    Arabic Arabic
    Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified)
    English English
    French French
    Hindi Hindi
    Pilipino (Tagalog) Pilipino (Tagalog)
    Punjabi Punjabi
    Spanish Spanish
    Tamil Tamil
    Urdu Urdu


    Edited by skhatoon - Oct/06/2010 at 3:14pm
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/06/2010 at 3:17pm
    I am pregnant and don't have OHIP. What health care can I get?
     
    If you do not have OHIP, you might be able to get health care services at a CHC.

    Find more information in What are Community Health Centres?

    Prenatal and Postnatal Care

    Public health units have programs for pregnant women. For example, the Health Babies, Health Children (HBHC) program has services for babies from before birth up to 6 years old. Contact your local public health unit for more information.

    Also, the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP) has many services and programs for pregnant women and parents. Find a CPNP in your community.

    Can a midwife help me?

    Getting care from a midwife can be a lower cost solution, especially for newcomers. As well, for any hospital or doctor treatment, some midwives can help you negotiate the costs. Most midwives and midwifery clinics have relationships with local hospitals and they understand the medical system and its costs better than you will. They can support you in planning for possible costs, and help you understand how the health system works during your pregnancy.

    Some midwifery clinics can serve pregnant women who do not have OHIP. If you have OHIP or not, you still must be a resident of Ontario. In other words, you must be living in Ontario to receive the services of a midwife. Each midwife clinic has a catchment area, a geographic area that you must live in to be served by them. If you do not have OHIP, you need to contact the midwifery clinic in your area to find out if they can serve you.

    How much does it cost to get care from a midwife?



    Edited by skhatoon - Oct/06/2010 at 3:17pm
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:24am

    Pregnancy and Parental Leaves and Benefits

    The Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA) provides pregnancy leave for birth mothers and parental leave for new parents.

    This section describes pregnancy and parental leave and your rights while on leave.

    What is pregnancy leave?

    Pregnant employees who began employment with the employer at least 13 weeks before the baby's expected birth date (the "due date") have the right to take up to 17 weeks of unpaid time off work. In some cases the leave may be longer. Contact us

    What is parental leave?

    New parents who have been employed for at least 13 weeks have the right to take unpaid time off work.

    A birth mother can take both pregnancy and parental leave.

    Birth mothers who took pregnancy leave are entitled to up to 35 weeks of parental leave. Employees who didn't take pregnancy leave are entitled to up to 37 weeks' parental leave.

    Both parents can be on leave at the same time. For example, as soon as the baby is born or comes into the custody, care and control of the parents for the first time, the father can take parental leave even though the mother is on pregnancy or parental leave.

    Who is considered to be a parent?

    A "parent" includes:

    • a birth parent
    • an adoptive parent (whether or not the adoption has been legally finalized)
    • a person who is in a relationship of some permanence with a parent of the child and who plans on treating the child as his or her own.

    Can a part time employee take pregnancy and parental leave?

    Full-time, part-time, permanent and term contract employees are entitled to pregnancy and parental leave.

    Can I be fired or let go if I am eligible to take pregnancy or parental leave?

    You can't be penalized in any way because you are or will become eligible to take a pregnancy or parental leave, or for taking or intending to take a pregnancy or parental leave. See Reprisals

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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:24am
    Do I get paid when I'm away on leave?

    The ESA leave provisions allow an employee to take time off work and to be reinstated when the leave ends. Under the ESA an employer is not required to pay an employee who is on pregnancy or parental leave although the employer must continue to pay the employer's share of the premiums for certain benefit plans (i.e., pension plans, life insurance, accidental death, extended health insurance and dental plans).

    However, employees who are on leave may qualify for employment insurance maternity or parental benefits through the federal government's employment insurance program. The rules regarding entitlement to these benefits are different from the rules regarding entitlement to pregnancy and parental leave under the ESA.

    You should contact your nearest federal government Service Canada Centre for information about employment insurance benefits.

    When do I qualify for pregnancy and parental leave?

    A pregnant employee is entitled to pregnancy leave if she was hired at least 13 weeks before the date her baby is expected to be born (called the "due date").

    To qualify for parental leave, as a new parent, you must have been hired at least 13 weeks before the leave begins.

    When can I begin pregnancy leave?

    Usually, the earliest a pregnancy leave can begin is 17 weeks before the baby's due date. However, if an employee has a live birth more than 17 weeks before the due date, she is entitled to a pregnancy leave although it must commence on the date of the birth.

    Otherwise, a pregnant employee may commence a pregnancy leave at any time within the 17-week period prior to the baby's due date, with the following restrictions:

    The leave must be commenced no later than the due date

    or

    the date the baby is born,

    whichever is earlier.

    So, if an employee was planning to commence her pregnancy leave on the due date but the baby was born sooner, she would have to start the leave on the date of the birth.

    When can I begin parental leave?

    Birth mothers who took a pregnancy leave must usually begin parental leave as soon as the pregnancy leave ends. All other parents must begin their parental leave no later than 52 weeks after the date the baby was born or the date the child first came into their custody, care and control.

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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:24am
    What do I earn in the way of credits during pregnancy and parental leave?

    Although you don't have to be paid during a pregnancy or parental leave, you continue to earn credits toward seniority, length of service and length of employment.

    What if I think my employer is not following the ESA?

    What if I think my employer is not following the ESA?

    Can I see the ESA?

    Employment Standards Act, 2000

    Resources

    Government:
    Ontario Ministry of Labour
    Your Guide to the Employment Standards Act, 2000: Pregnancy and Parental Leave

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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:25am
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:25am
    Taking%20time%20off%20work
    Taking time off work: Pregnancy and Parental Leaves and Benefits
    (PDF 201 KB)
    June 2008

    This booklet explains pregnancy and parental leaves under Ontario law and pregnancy and parental Employment Insurance (EI) benefits for new and expecting parents. Charts show the number of weeks of EI benefits and time off work that birth parents and adopting parents can receive if they qualify.
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:25am

    Maternity Leave Benefits

    How do I get benefits?

    To get maternity leave benefits, you'll have to apply to your local Human Resources Centre.

    You're eligible for maternity benefits if:
    • Your regular weekly pay goes down by more than 40%.
    • You have 600 insurable hours of work in the last 52 weeks or since your last claim.

    How much will I get?

    The basic rate is 55% of your average insured earnings to a maximum of $413 a week. You don't get paid for the first two weeks of your claim.

    You can receive maternity benefits for up to 15 weeks. If you qualify for maternity benefits, you may also be able to claim parental benefits if you decide to take parental leave.

    You can also get help from an unemployed workers' help centre. If you live in British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Saskatchewan or Québec, see if there's a help centre in your area.
     
    Click here for more details on maternity and parental benefits.
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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:25am

    PARENTAL AND ADOPTION LEAVES

    Work and Family Provisions in Canadian Collective Agreements

    Parental leave is designed to provide either or both parents with time to spend with their newborns. For the mother, parental leave provisions commonly stipulate that the leave be taken immediately after maternity leave, thereby extending the total leave period. For the father, parental leave provisions allow time off to help with the care of the newborn; sometimes collective agreement language that is gender-specific to the father is referred to as "paternity" leave.

    Adoption leave is designed to allow adoptive parents time to care for their adopted child and to give both the family and the child an opportunity to adapt to each other. Adoption leave provisions are usually directly linked to parental leave clauses, which explains why the two are combined in this section. Where there are separate clauses in a collective agreement pertaining, respectively, to parental and adoption leaves, their stipulations usually mirror each other. Nonetheless, some provisions relating specifically to adoption leave will be highlighted.

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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:25am
    Self-employed professional consultant - Maternity and parental benefits
     
    • Maternity benefits are available to birth mothers and cover the period surrounding the birth. A claim can begin up to eight weeks before the expected birth date, and benefits are payable for up to 15 weeks.
    • Parental benefits are available to biological or adoptive parents while they are caring for a newborn or newly adopted child or children. Parental benefits are payable for up to 35 weeks. These 35 weeks may be taken by one parent alone or shared between them. If parents opt to share these benefits, only one two-week waiting period must be served. Parental benefits are payable for up to 35 weeks.

    (Courtesy of: http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/sc/ei/benefits/examples/self_employed_workers.shtml)

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    Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/07/2010 at 9:25am
    Employment Insurance
    Produced by Community Advocacy & Legal Centre (CALC)
    Produced in 2009
    This tip sheet explains the kinds of Employment Insurance (EI) benefits available to workers who lose their employment (Regular Benefits), who are sick (Sickness Benefits), who have children (Maternity and Parental Benefits), and who take time off to care for gravely ill family members (Compassionate Care Benefits).
    Available in English
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